what does it really mean to be a feminist in 2021?

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What makes someone a feminist? How have cultural, social, and political standards for being a feminist changed in 2021? What does it mean to be an intersectional feminist after “the age of trump”? And do white feminists count as feminists? I often think about what makes someone a real feminist, when the word “feminist” gets thrown around a lot lately. As cultural and social standards change, maybe we, as feminists, need to raise what we consider to be feminism and push ourselves to advocate for equality that needs to exist in 2021. What comes to mind is the phrase “it’s the twenty-first century” when used in response to an outdated comment. I think I’ve made it more than clear in the last few posts, but the language is extremely important, and so defining such a significant term as “feminist” is just as important. And by reflecting on what it means to be a proactive, productive, and genuine feminist, maybe we will all become better ones.

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should we use the term “people of color”?

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I recently wrote a post about political correctness. In that post, I discuss how a conversation with my friend caused me to reexamine political correctness and then motivated me to share the conversation surrounding it with all of you! I also mentioned that in this conversation, my friend and I discussed what it meant to be a “woman of color”. I looked it up (as one does during a friendly political discussion) and found more than I was looking for, in the best way possible. And so began my deep dive into articles about what it means to be a “woman of color” and is it inclusive or should we use alternatives. This is a topic that a lot of people think they know about, but maybe don’t know the entire story. And because of that, they don’t know the reasons behind a lot of discontent or support of the phrase, “people of color”. A lot of the issues within this larger conversation arise because rather than try to understand the roots of the phrase or the reasons for discontent, people just want to know – what word do I use. Someone might know that the phrase “African-American” isn’t always the best to use, but they don’t take the time to understand why or why people feel that way. So, in this post, I am going to discuss a lot of things, but primarily the roots of this discussion and where we are now. As always, I have included all my sources and suggestions for further reading at the end of the post. Something I did a little differently in this post, is that I included a lot of direct quotes from articles and individuals because I thought they were too compelling to paraphrase and the strongest as they were. 

 

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is it important to be politically correct?​

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I recently had a very interesting conversation with my friend. Like myself, she is very active in politics and activism, and we have a lot of impromptu discussions, like one that we had recently about being politically correct. It started as a conversation about the representation of women in color, and then I learn that she doesn’t consider herself/ doesn’t know if she is a woman of color, as an Iranian-American. And so, I did a deep dive into what it means to be a woman of color, and the specifics of using that “political language correctly”. Then began our conversation about being politically correct. Is it important? Is it a social construct? Does it make the world more tolerant? Do people care or is it just a part of cancel culture? I’m going, to be honest, I had never thought about this topic in that way. And that’s probably because political correctness is only shown in one light, regardless of what people might think is right or wrong. As I researched and continued this conversation, I kept thinking, “why haven’t I heard of this before” and “why hasn’t anyone (until now) told me about this”. Part of my reason for blogging is sharing topics that might not get shared otherwise. In this post, I am going to do a deep dive into this conversation on political correctness. Rather than “answer” some of those questions I mentioned earlier, I am going to explore the ways to approach them. I also included links (as always) to some further reading and my sources at the end of the post, many of which are interesting. I like to think that all the resources I include in every post are interesting, but these are truly thought-provoking, and many are passionate opinion pieces.

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how effective are petitions?​

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If you have a social media account, there is a very good chance that you have seen an increase in petitions being shared. You may have even signed a few. The pandemic has created limits on social justice organizing, leading to a lot of activism being conducted on social media and online. This topic has a lot of connections to slacktivism and general social media activism, which you can read about if you click here. I find these types of topics so fascinating and pertinent because of how activism and politics are changing. I also think that any way we can raise our productivity and efficacy as activists is worth discussing and learning about. Are petitions effective? Are they a form of slacktivism? If they aren’t effective, are there benefits? I have included some resources at the end of this post, ranging from opinion pieces on petitions to how to start your own petition.

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is sustainability a privilege?

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I have spit out a lot of rhetoric and information, on this blog, about sustainability and the progression of climate change. However, something I don’t always mention is the economic considerations of being sustainable. Not everyone can afford package free toothpaste or 100% recycled material clothing. And while there may be a lot of companies that are trying to make sustainability more affordable, not everyone has access to them. Additionally, we live in a society and have a government that turns a blind eye to companies that overlook their effect on climate change, because it’s economically profitable for them. If we want to promote climate change action effectively, then we need to make sure that it’s an option for everyone, and holds everyone accountable.

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let’s talk about slacktivism

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Between challenging systemic racism through the Black Lives Matter Movement to the fight for voting rights in the upcoming US election, a lot is happening in the world right now. On top of it, the coronavirus has restricted our access to conventional activist opportunities. AND social media is on the rise, becoming pervasive and an even stronger tool in our society. All of these combined equal the need for people to take action. However, these conditions have also fostered a rise in slacktivism. There are a lot of questions to answer and a lot of things to discuss, especially if we want to be productive social media activists and activists in general. Additionally, I want to mention that you don’t need to be “an activist” to promote change and create a world that is more just and fair.

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let’s talk about the missing diversity in english class

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I was recently reminded of the blatant lack of diversity that still plagues our classrooms. I go through this every year. Back to school sales are popping up as everyone prepares for next year. No matter how unconventional that year is going to be, students are preparing and buying supplies. Among those supplies are books for English and literature classes. As I viewed my list of required books for the year, I wasn’t even surprised that all of them, but one, were written by white men. I have written posts before about problematic aspects of literature, this post is going to focus on its role in classrooms.

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how you can fight against racism

This post is going to be more serious. However, I’m not going to talk about how the government and local authorities are failing to reform a long-lasting issue of police violence, gun violence, police militarization, all fueled by racism. This post is going to be a compilation of resources for you to actively fight racism, specifically in regards to recent acts of racist police violence against black men, such as George Floyd. And just racism in general. If you do have any credible resources that I may have missed, feel free to email me so that I can add them to this post or leave them in the comments.

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why can’t i find a book written by author of color?

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I love books a lot. I specifically love gender studies, political ideology, and classics. However, I noticed something recently as I was looking for more books to read during this quarantine. All of the books I’m looking at are written by white men. And the books that haven’t been written by white people are books that focus on race. It’s hard to find a simple politics book written by someone than a white guy. Not to say that I don’t enjoy books about racial relationships, but why aren’t there more minority authors writing a variety of books. Why aren’t more minorities becoming authors and writers in general? That’s what I’m going to try to figure out in this post. You can click here to read my booklist about some of my favorite books written by minority authors and some of my favorite minority authors.

 

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my book list written by minorities

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I was planning and writing a blog post about two of my favorite topics, minority representation, and books! This post is going to be the intro to that bigger and more serious posts. I wanted to do this booklist first to be a little more optimistic and because what better to do, since we are all in quarantine than reading!!! I’m going to share some of my favorite books written by minority authors, with a range of genres. I’m also just going to share some authors that have written too many great books to list, but I still wanted to include. Additionally, I will leave links to each book in case you want to purchase them. Feel free to leave any book recommendations in the comments, because I’m always looking for new ones.

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let’s talk about asian pacific american heritage month

asian american heritage month 2020
I know that May is almost over, but I still want to take the time to recognize Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM). I didn’t want to rush this post, and I wanted to make sure I did it right, even if that meant that it would come out halfway through the month. I am Asian American, but before this year I didn’t know what APAHM was. Of course, I was aware of it, but I never really took the time to read into the history of how different cultures celebrate it. This post is going to go over the general information about APAHM and what it’s history and purpose is.

 

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how has blogging helped me as a global citizen

 

Recently, I’ve been thinking about why I blog about politics and feminism. The main reason I could think of was that I have become a better global citizen and activist. This is post is going to be mainly about how blogging and writing have impacted me, but also about what a global citizen is and why it’s important. Like always, I have some resources and articles at the bottom of the page for further reading.

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how are we going to have a discussion if people don’t want to talk

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Even after being called an “aggressive feminist” and “way too opinionated”, I still like to respectfully engage in discussions and conversations. I think they are necessary and I’m not afraid to contribute to larger discussions. However, I wonder, we have these discussions and try to raise awareness, but why aren’t things changing. Perhaps because some of the people that have trouble understanding aren’t in the conversations. That’s the main thing I want to discuss. How are we going to see and promote change if the people it would benefit, people that don’t understand, and everyone, in general, won’t talk or discuss?

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developing your own opinion

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At school and just in general, I’m known for having very strong opinions and not holding them back. And I like to think that I have a very good way of developing my opinions. However, I’ve noticed that some people, who aren’t like me, have trouble sharing their opinion or even figuring out what they believe in. Which is something I mention a lot in almost every post. It’s so important that we have opinions and even more importantly, speak them. I’m going to talk about the importance of forming an opinion and how to make sure they are genuinely yours.

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stoping joking about global emergencies

The title may not have been clear, but this post is going to be about the perception of the coronavirus. I’m in high school as many of you know, where jokes about the coronavirus are widespread and people are ignorant. I can’t go a day without hearing problematic and insensitive jokes about the coronavirus. Not just jokes, but rumors and false information makes everything even worse. This post is going to discuss why I believe we all need to be more sensitive about the coronavirus and why we need to start taking it more seriously. More than that, the importance of staying aware and informed. I also included some more articles with more opinions and also the facts about the virus.

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why intersectionality is important

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Get ready, because this is going to be a very controversial post, but when am I ever not controversial. When I first sat down to write this post, I was going to call it, “what is white feminism”. However, I decided to change it because that’s not really what I want to talk about. Yes, I am going to talk about how white feminism can be harmful and contradictory to feminism. But I also want to talk about the significance of intersectional feminist, what it is, and how it’s the actual embodiment of feminism. Continue reading

how the media is manipulating us : minority representation

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I really wanted to write about how the media’s manipulation and choices affect us, often negatively. That’s when I realized that their actions far exceed the capacity of one blogpost. So this is going to be like a little series. Today’s main focus, minority representation. How does the media portray people and women of color? How do they create stereotypes? Who is affected by this? Are non-minority people aware of the erroneous messages? Those questions are going to be addressed and discussed. I am also going to focus on real world examples that let you decide how you feel and also to show how prevalent it is. Big warning, I am probably going to criticize and expose some of your favorite movies, media platforms, and pop culture idols. So get ready.

 

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how have I listened to society?

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I think we all care a lot about something, no matter if that is politics or feminism (like me) or something like math. I take a lot of pride in all of the ways that I try to defy the patriarchy and actively seek out change. But I was just thinking, no one is really perfect especially when it involves a big change like that. It might even be an unconscious practice I have, like saying sorry or supporting unethical brands. (both of which I have found ways to eliminate or improve on in the past couple years) In this post, I am going to discuss some of the ways I “let” society and even the patriarchy affect my life, how I try to change that, and why it’s ok + normal. I’d also like to hear from other people and all of your opinions in the comments!

 

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