book recommendations that help develop your mindset

rohinikudva_1

It’s been so long since my last post that I feel like I need to reintroduce myself. Hi, I’m Rohini, a burnt-out student who, after a year and a half of online school, was kind of tired of sitting and writing at a computer. My last post came out in March, and then I told myself once finals and exams were over, I’d spend the summer rediscovering my love for blogging and writing. What ended up happening is that once summer started, I found myself finally relaxing a bit and engaging in a lot of doing nothing. However, I’m ready to get back to blogging (which I love), and what better way to re-enter the blogging world than with a book recommendations post? When I said I’ve been spending the summer doing nothing, what actually I meant is that I’ve been reading. A lot. I can definitively say that this summer, I have spent more time reading than on my phone. In this post, I’m sharing some of the books that I feel helped me develop my unique perspective. These books taught me new things, actively employed my critical thinking skills, and are just great books in general. I have a mix of nonfiction, essay collections, classic literature, etc. Please feel free to leave any book recommendations you may have in the comments!

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lets talk about false equivalences

false equivalence

 

There’s still a lot going on in the world, and a lot of changes occurring in the U.S. specifically, but it feels calmer. In this post, I am going to be addressing false equivalence, what it is, why it matters, and some very important examples of it in recent history. This isn’t a new term, but as we live through examples of false equivalencies and face the effects of past ones, we need to keep it in our minds and discussions. I first heard about it this year, but after learning and reading about the specific, I’ve realized that it’s something we have all noticed but maybe didn’t place a term to. Especially after the comparisons between the BLM protests and the Capitol Riots, people are beginning to call out false equivalences and are starting to recognize more. I have included links and resources throughout for further reading, as well as all of my sources and recommended opinion pieces at the bottom. My past few articles have stayed on the unbiased and informational side, but this post is going to be a little different. That doesn’t mean that it isn’t trustworthy or accurate, but that you should approach this article differently.

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let’s talk about slacktivism

slacktivism_2020

Between challenging systemic racism through the Black Lives Matter Movement to the fight for voting rights in the upcoming US election, a lot is happening in the world right now. On top of it, the coronavirus has restricted our access to conventional activist opportunities. AND social media is on the rise, becoming pervasive and an even stronger tool in our society. All of these combined equal the need for people to take action. However, these conditions have also fostered a rise in slacktivism. There are a lot of questions to answer and a lot of things to discuss, especially if we want to be productive social media activists and activists in general. Additionally, I want to mention that you don’t need to be “an activist” to promote change and create a world that is more just and fair.

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how has blogging helped me as a global citizen

 

Recently, I’ve been thinking about why I blog about politics and feminism. The main reason I could think of was that I have become a better global citizen and activist. This is post is going to be mainly about how blogging and writing have impacted me, but also about what a global citizen is and why it’s important. Like always, I have some resources and articles at the bottom of the page for further reading.

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