let’s talk about the riots in dc​

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The fact that I am writing the first article of the year on such a monumental, horrific event is very telling of the state the country is in. I live 30 minutes away from DC, but this is something that affects us all, regardless of proximity to the capital. I wanted to write this post, not only to properly address the riots but to provide a credible guide to those of you who are maybe overwhelmed with everything happening and those who want to stay aware. Additionally, I wanted to talk about some topics such as responsible social media use and credible information, that I have written about before but are even more important at this moment in history. As I always do, I have included links and resources that I used in this post and recommend reading. It is more important than ever that we are working towards spreading factual and reliable information, and I want to assure all of you reading that this post is no different.

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why do we avoid confronting western feminism?

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Hopefully, this post is going to make a lot of the feminists and global citizens better and more conscious of the realities of the world and women. This semester, I had the opportunity to create my own independent study class and curriculum. Something I’ve started becoming more dedicated to is furthering my feminist knowledge and awareness. This mainly meant that I wanted to know what other cultures, countries, parts of the world I have missed out on learning due to my western and euro-centric learnings, and bubble. As feminists, we often learn about Betty Friedan, Simone de Beauvoir, and Mary Wollstonecraft. That becomes our idea of feminism. However, this western bubble limits our understanding and creates a harmful ignorance, and weakens our feminism. Within the first week of learning about unacknowledged parts of feminism, my western mindset was burst. For example, I had never truly examined the connotations of monogamy that differ from Europe, where it is considered unacceptable, to some African countries, where it gave women opportunities to work and co-parent. This post is meant to be a wakeup call and introduction to the sides of feminism that we don’t acknowledge, and the feminism we forget about.

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why intersectionality is important

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Get ready, because this is going to be a very controversial post, but when am I ever not controversial. When I first sat down to write this post, I was going to call it, “what is white feminism”. However, I decided to change it because that’s not really what I want to talk about. Yes, I am going to talk about how white feminism can be harmful and contradictory to feminism. But I also want to talk about the significance of intersectional feminist, what it is, and how it’s the actual embodiment of feminism. Continue reading

acknowledging the uncomfortable things

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If you have read any of the posts on this blog or know me, you won’t be surprised when I say that I talk a lot about feminism and politics. I bring it up a lot in my everyday life too. I can’t help but bring it up when I’m watching a movie that has no women, or when I’m reading a book with manipulative ideas surrounding politics. And although it’s natural for me to think about stuff like that (because how can I ignore it), I often get asked why I have to bring it up. Why do I have to “make everything so serious”? Why do I have to make everyone else uncomfortable? Why do I have to point out that the story we are reading in class has hints of white privilege? I’m asked these questions almost every day. I’m asked by my peers, by society, and sometimes, by my mind. But the question I want to ask is, How can I not talk about these important things, whether or not they are uncomfortable? 

 

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